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The only thing worse than doing celebrities doing callous, insensitive shit like this is the half-ass apology that it tends to come with, and our flavor-of-the-day Lily Allen proves to be no exception. 
According to Metro, Lily Allen had this to say in defense of the video: 

Whilst I don’t want to offend anyone. I do strive to provoke thought and conversation.

The video is meant to be a lighthearted satirical video that deals with objectification of women within modern pop culture. It has nothing to do with race, at all.

I don’t have much to say that hasn’t been said already (in addition to my statements from above), but I don’t even know how or why anyone (particularly a woman) could take the objectification of women and turn it into a lighthearted satire, nor do I understand how the objectification of women seeks to prove that point. This isn’t an instance where fighting fire with fire works, nor will two negatives make a positive. 
As previously mentioned, I don’t understand how anyone could be oblivious to the racial implications their actions could have. I think it’s completely irresponsible and damn near impossible to not understand that to use provocatively dressed women of color twerking to illustrate how hard it is for a bitch. Black women, twerking, misogyny, feminism, and sexism have been amongst some of the most talked about topics (both individually and as a group) of this year. And simply saying it’s not a race thing does not magically alleviate you of understanding the implications of your actions in a racial context. You’d have to be stupid to not understand what such imagery applies, but I can’t be surprised that it came from a person who painted their white husband’s dick black to signify a black woman. 

You do not get new results from repeating the same steps. You do not use the same tactics, same imagery, same symbolism, and same rhetoric to create a new point. It doesn’t work like that. Let this be a glaring example of such. 
By now, I’m sure that the interwebs have become acquainted with Julianne Hough’s homage to Crazy Eyes from “Orange Is The New Black.” She bronzed her skin and made a horrid attempt at crowning some Nubian Knots onto her head to celebrate the character played by the talented Uzo Aduba. 
Hough apologized for the costume, saying that she had no intention of being disrespectful or demeaning in any way; quite frankly, I can believe that. Even through a stock and trite apology, I can truly believe that she probably had no idea that her costume would cause such a response. Which is, in itself, a huge problem. How Hough can actively live, breathe, and function in 2013 (a year where there have been a more than a few headlines about white people in blackface) without understanding or even acknowledging how serious an issue race, both historically and in the present day, is a reflection of the unquestionable privilege she has as a white woman.
In addition to thinking that this was an insanely stupid idea of a costume (it’s almost parallel to my feelings to Zoe Saldana being cast as Nina Simone, and she looks less like Crazy Eyes and more like that mom that tanned herself into a leather couch tried to tan her 6-year old daughter as well), I am of the school of thought that dictates that celebrity status, to some degree, requires a platform of awareness and responsibility.  Of all the costumes in the world, I can’t understand how she became so intent on being Crazy Eyes. And I can’t understand how she or anyone around her could be so blithely unaware of the world around them to not even contemplate the consequences of her actions as (a) a human being and U.S. citizen and (b) as a celebrity, but here we are. 
There is nothing that a second or third thought can’t fix. While everything is an imminent learning experience, if you are unsure of the impact your actions will have, there’s a pretty good chance that you shouldn’t be doing it, especially when you’re in a position with high visibility like Hough. If you have no intention to disrespect or demean, as Hough said, then do yourself a favor and not do that thing that you don’t mean to offend anyone by, because you probably will offend someone despite your greatest attempts to not do so. I just cannot wrap my mind around how stupid one person can be. Her actions were tasteless and stupid, and I hope she knows it. 
Just listen to Sherry yall. 

By now, I’m sure that the interwebs have become acquainted with Julianne Hough’s homage to Crazy Eyes from “Orange Is The New Black.” She bronzed her skin and made a horrid attempt at crowning some Nubian Knots onto her head to celebrate the character played by the talented Uzo Aduba. 

Hough apologized for the costume, saying that she had no intention of being disrespectful or demeaning in any way; quite frankly, I can believe that. Even through a stock and trite apology, I can truly believe that she probably had no idea that her costume would cause such a response. Which is, in itself, a huge problem. How Hough can actively live, breathe, and function in 2013 (a year where there have been a more than a few headlines about white people in blackface) without understanding or even acknowledging how serious an issue race, both historically and in the present day, is a reflection of the unquestionable privilege she has as a white woman.

In addition to thinking that this was an insanely stupid idea of a costume (it’s almost parallel to my feelings to Zoe Saldana being cast as Nina Simone, and she looks less like Crazy Eyes and more like that mom that tanned herself into a leather couch tried to tan her 6-year old daughter as well), I am of the school of thought that dictates that celebrity status, to some degree, requires a platform of awareness and responsibility.  Of all the costumes in the world, I can’t understand how she became so intent on being Crazy Eyes. And I can’t understand how she or anyone around her could be so blithely unaware of the world around them to not even contemplate the consequences of her actions as (a) a human being and U.S. citizen and (b) as a celebrity, but here we are. 

There is nothing that a second or third thought can’t fix. While everything is an imminent learning experience, if you are unsure of the impact your actions will have, there’s a pretty good chance that you shouldn’t be doing it, especially when you’re in a position with high visibility like Hough. If you have no intention to disrespect or demean, as Hough said, then do yourself a favor and not do that thing that you don’t mean to offend anyone by, because you probably will offend someone despite your greatest attempts to not do so. I just cannot wrap my mind around how stupid one person can be. Her actions were tasteless and stupid, and I hope she knows it. 

Just listen to Sherry yall. 

While there are plenty of moments where I want Azealia Banks to sit down and shut the entire fuck up, there is no reason for racist, ignorant shit like this. Period. The fucking end. 

And to a world sick with racism, get well soon.

— Janet Jackson 

WALKING WHILE BLACK IN NEW YORK →

Welcome to New York, where New York Police are being required to disrupt and potentially end the lives of black men before they even start; if they don’t end physically, they definitely are ending systematically. 


Just spot the number of fails you see here.
Jezebel posted this article about sixteen year old Ondria Hardin was featured in this editorial entitled African Queen for some magazine. I don’t even care. It’s disheartening to see black models obviously being passed over for a white model only to be bronzed to death to look black. You mean to tell me that of all of the beautiful black women in the world, none of them, not one would have been right for this spread? Not. One.
Bullshit. 
The racism present in the modeling industry is disgusting and I don’t know how many people continue subject themselves to it. It is painfully clear that black woman’s aesthetic (or any WOC, for that matter) is rarely, if ever appreciated and represented in a larger, more worldly context. And I wouldn’t be surprised to find the same experience for MOC as well. I would never. Should I ever have a child, they would never, ever step foot into a casting.
Certainly not living at least. 

Just spot the number of fails you see here.

Jezebel posted this article about sixteen year old Ondria Hardin was featured in this editorial entitled African Queen for some magazine. I don’t even care. It’s disheartening to see black models obviously being passed over for a white model only to be bronzed to death to look black. You mean to tell me that of all of the beautiful black women in the world, none of them, not one would have been right for this spread? Not. One.

Bullshit. 

The racism present in the modeling industry is disgusting and I don’t know how many people continue subject themselves to it. It is painfully clear that black woman’s aesthetic (or any WOC, for that matter) is rarely, if ever appreciated and represented in a larger, more worldly context. And I wouldn’t be surprised to find the same experience for MOC as well. I would never. Should I ever have a child, they would never, ever step foot into a casting.

Certainly not living at least. 

The GIF Set does her no justice. 

"By filling out this Self Identification Record, you are helping us to comply with government record keeping, reporting and other legal requirements. This data will be kept in a Confidential File separate from the Application for Employment, and will only be used for periodic government reporting."

You forgot the part where it said, ‘Oh, and we’re keeping your black ass out of this company. Thanks, but no thanks.’

I think it would be such a better practice if that was saved for the actual face-to-face interview. When applying, my race shouldn’t matter; my credentials should. But of course, this is America, where nothing matters more than the color of your skin, especially when it’s said it doesn’t matter at all. 

Oy. 

…see it’s easy for cats to kill other cats; it’s just the dogs that they got trouble with… if you kick let someone kick you five times, he’s going to kick you five times. If you let him kick you three times. If you let him kick you two times, he’ll kick you two times. If you let him kick you once, he’ll kick you once. But if you break off the motherfucking feet, there will be no more kicking going on kid.

— From The Fugees’ Outro, off of their album The Score

We live in a ___________ society. →

Hint: It’s dam sure is not a post-racial one. 

Schools have classes called “women’s studies,” and “African-American literature” because the standard for existence set by white men has yet to be rescinded in this age. “Normal” history is the history of a certain class of white people, from the perspective of men. All the other histories are precisely that: other.

Cunt:  A Declaration of Independence. (via ratsandcandy666)

(via erinripley-deactivated20131113)

tfjustin:

A Recession for White Americans, A Depression for Black and Latino Americans

soydulcedeleche:

fantasmita:

Essentially, all of the economic gains made by people of color since the Civil Rights Movement have been erased in a few years by the Long Recession. Whites experienced a net wealth loss of 16 percent from 2005 to 2009, while blacks lost about half of their wealth (53 percent) and Latinos lost two-thirds of their wealth.

Media outlets reporting on the Pew study point to housing loss as the primary culprit, since the net worth of blacks and Latinos is heavily reliant on home ownership, while whites are more likely to have retirement accounts and stock.

Rampant–and racist–fraud in the home loan industry was a primary contributor to the collapse, with 61 percent of sub-prime loan holders actually qualifying for prime loans that would have been easier to maintain. Blacks and Latinos were especially targeted for sub-prime loans, a practice called “reverse redlining.” Wells Fargo loan officer-turned-whistle blower Elizabeth Jacobson admitted that her company specifically went after African Americans for sub-prime loans through “wealth building” conferences hosted in black churches.

The employment gap between whites and blacks is also a contributor to the wealth gap. While white American are suffering through the Long Recession with 7.9 percent unemployment, blacks are experiencing Great Depression-like figures of 16.1 percent unemployment. This figure jumps to 31.4 percent for blacks ages 16 to 24, and black Americans have consistently had the higher rate of unemployment compared to white Americans since 2007.

Not surprisingly, the employment gap, too, has racist origins. The Center for American Progress analyzed unemployment data from the last three recessions and found that black unemployment starts earlier, rises faster and lingers longer. Explanations include the concentration of black workers in the stumbling manufacturing sector, the cutting of public sector jobs–and racial discrimination. This last finding is no shock given that employers are more likely to call back a white job applicant with a criminal record than a similarly qualified black man without a record.

The role of racism in poverty is important to keep in mind at a time Washington politicians are manufacturing crises that will slash the entitlement programs that 1 in 6 Americans rely on. It’s ironic that we’re cutting safety nets for the poor just as we’re experiencing the highest poverty rate since 1960, with blacks and Latinos three times as likely to live in poverty. Public policy is supposed to knock down racial and other non-meritorious barriers to pursuing life, liberty, and happiness, not jack them higher.

But white privilege doesn’t exist and racism is long gone, right post-racial America? 

yes. reblogging for obvious lack of white privilege.